Loeb Danish Ardt Collection - page 109

[

account of some small pictures, in particular the superb little painting of a girl writing a letter.”
It is no
wonder that the artist chose to reproduce his little masterpiece, for there was a market for it.
The three

versions of
Young Girl Writing
are almost identical. They have practically the same dimen-
sions, but slight di
ff
erences in the execution of each individual work distinguish them from each other. We
will consider Version
to be in the Loeb collection. Version
(Fig. A) belongs to Ribe Kunstmuseum. The
current owners of Version
(Fig. B) and Version
(Fig. C) are not known. Version
(

) is a little smaller
than the others (
¼
x
⅓
in., or

x

cm) and introduces some changes, including a detailed close-up of
the girl, though the motif is the same.
There are photographs and records of the provenance of versions
and
in the collection of photo-
graphs in the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, but their present whereabouts are unknown.
In the important
Kunstens Historie i Danmark
published in

, edited and written mainly by the art his-
torian Karl Madsen,
the author writes about the reception of Danish art in the

World Fair in Paris,
when French critics expressed a “unanimous and merciless condemnation of the artistic failings in our
national painting.”
For more than thirty years, Danish artists had followed the injunctions of the art historian N.L. Høyen
to paint mainly Danish landscapes and Danish everyday life, for which reason artists had adapted very little
FIG. A: VERSION
Young Girl Writing,

Oil on canvas,
¾
x

in. (

x

cm)
Signed and dated lower left: Chr. Dalsgaard, Sorø

Ribe Kunstmuseum
FIG. B VERSION
Young Girl Writing,

Oil on canvas,
¾
x

in. (

x

cm)
Signed and dated lower left: Chr. Dalsgaard, Sorø

Owner unknown
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