Loeb Danish Ardt Collection - page 190

portraits, not only in those of Ida. Hammershøi’s biographer Poul Vad points out how the artist has hinted
at a flower in her hand, so that the painting relates to
The Girl with the Carnation
(Statens Museum for
Kunst), which until

was thought to be a work by Rembrandt, and after which Hammershøi made a
drawing. Vad also suggests another possible inspiration for this portrait of Ida, Paul Gauguin’s
Vahine no te
Tiare
(Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek), the portrait of a woman from Tahiti, which was included in the Free Exhi-
bition in

.
The Loeb portrait study originally belonged to Karl Madsen (

-

), who was the spokesman for the
painters of the Modern Breakthrough in the

’s and by whomHammershøi was one of those promoted.
He was included in Hammershøi’s great
Five Portraits
(Thielska Galleriet, Stockholm). A close friendship
between the Madsen and Hammershøi families continued for several generations. Hammershøi was god-
father to Madsen’s granddaughter Else Lofthus (

-

), who owned this picture until her death. Karl
Madsen himself rated it so highly that he included it in the prestigious exhibition in Paris in

, where he
presented a French public a choice of fine art with what he considered the best of Danish painting.
E.F.

]
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