Loeb Danish Ardt Collection - page 197

VILHELM HAMMERSHØI
   ‒    
 .
Interior with Windsor Chair
(

)
(Interiør med windsorstol. Strandgade

)
Oil on canvas,

x

¼ in. (

.
x

cm)
Not signed, nor inscribed
       :
Ida Hammershøi, the artist’s wife; Anna Hammershøi, the artist’s sister; Engineer Peter Olufsen and Kamma
Ilsted, niece of Ida Hammershøi (a gift from the above); Ambassador Henning Halck; Ms. Franciska Halck, Copenhagen;
Sotheby’s, London December

th

, lot

, ill.
         :
Copenhagen, Ordrupgaard,
Vilhelm Hammershøi
,

, no.

, ill. p.

; New York, Wildenstein, Washington, The
Philips Collection,

pt,

, no.

.
         :
Alfred Bramsen and Sophus Michaëlis,
Vilhelm Hammershøi. Kunstneren og hans Værk,
Copenhagen

, p.

, no.

(described as:
Stue
); Poul Vad,
Hammershøi, værk og liv,
Copenhagen

, p.

, ill. (described as:
Interiør med windsorstol.
Strandgade

); Poul Vad,
Vilhelm Hammershøi and Danish Art at the Turn of the Century,
New Haven, London

, ill. p.

;
Susanne Meyer-Abich,
Vilhelm Hammershøi. Das malerische Werk
,

no.

; Poul Vad,
Hammershøi, værk og liv,
Copenhagen

,
p.

(mentioned), ill. p.

; Tom Okke in:
Børsen
December
th

; Camilla Stockmann in:
Politiken,
December

th

.
V
ilhelm Hammershøi characteristically worked in series of paintings. In the beautiful apartments that
he inhabited, he explored the individual rooms from different angles and in different lightings. Often,
he would paint a parlor from the same angle with varying pieces of furniture, persons or pieces of art. In
other words, the interior paintings from his apartments render only selected parts of the reality that was the
artist’s home; they have been composed from purely artistic intentions. According to contemporary eye-
witnesses, Hammerhøi’s rooms were not at all as empty as one would believe, but furnished normally, and
with pictures on the walls.
In this apartment, in Strandgade

, that originally served as the Asiatic Company office rooms, and
whose building details are typical of late baroque architecture, four consecutive parlors were found to the
north west, connected by doors that are all the same distance from a wall with windows. Two of them are
panel doors, while the one closest to the front is a so-called jib door. It interested Hammerhøi to look
through this succession of doors, and this is one of a total of four paintings by him from this particular place
in the apartment; one more of these four is also in the Loeb Collection (no.

). One senses in all of these
the painter’s joy of living in a house with such grand architectural qualities. The house of the Asiatic Com-
pany was designed by the Dutch-born architect Philip de Lange (c.


) and erected just before

.
In
Interior with Windsor Chair
, we see the corner of the front room with the wall panel that continues in
the door, which we see in a sharp profile. Light streams from the left, from a window that is not in the pic-
ture, but the presence of which is indicated by the bevel of the window and the light curtain. In the next
parlor, where the light is similarly coming from a corresponding window to the left, a Windsor chair stands
to the left, with its back toward the viewer. The next door is shut. Hammershøi here renders the exact same
interior from the two parlors as in
Interior with Woman Standing
(Loeb Collection no.

. Fig. A). The open
jib door stands in the same position, but in
Interior with Windsor Chair
, its bottom edge is also seen, just as
more of the floor is visible. Here the chair stands in replacement of the figure of Ida Hammershøi, and the
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